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Sourdough Keto Baguettes

4.7 stars, average of 1,148 ratings

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I love sourdough bread. When I switched whole foods based low-carb diet, it was the one thing I missed the most. Adapting traditional recipes for a low-carb, gluten-free diet has been quite a challenge, but I've finally perfected my sourdough keto baguettes.

This version of "sourdough" is quick and unlike typical sourdough, it doesn't require days of culturing. By using vinegar and buttermilk, I've recreated that typical sourdough taste we all love. Compared to other keto breads, I also had to tweak the cooking temperature and time to avoid burning, possibly due to the buttermilk.

This isn't my first sourdough recipe. I created plenty more keto bread recipes for the KetoDiet App (you can get 25% off by using this link) and my 10 cookbooks.

In the following sections, I'll walk you through the ingredients and method for making these keto baguettes, share some handy tips and substitutions, troubleshoot common issues, and suggest other recipes you'll LOVE.

The Role of Each Ingredient in Keto Sourdough Bread

Each ingredient in these sourdough keto baguettes has a specific purpose, working together to create a delicious, low-carb bread that mimics the texture and taste of traditional sourdough. Here's a breakdown of why we use each component:

  • Almond Flour: This is the base of our keto baguettes, providing a rich, nutty flavor and a sturdy structure without the carbs found in traditional flour.
  • Psyllium Husks: Used for its ability to absorb moisture and create a chewy texture, similar to traditional bread. It also adds fiber, which is essential in a keto diet.
  • Coconut Flour: Adds density and helps balance the moisture content. Coconut flour is highly absorbent, so it’s crucial for achieving the right texture.
  • Flax Meal: Adds a more rustic flavor and works as a binding agent, helping the dough hold together.
  • Baking Soda: Acts as a leavening agent, helping the baguettes rise and become fluffy.
  • Sea Salt: Enhances the overall flavor of the bread.
  • Egg Whites and Eggs: The eggs provide structure and help the bread rise. Using mostly egg whites prevents the bread from becoming too dense.
  • Low-Fat Buttermilk or Kefir: Adds moisture and a tangy flavor, mimicking the taste of traditional sourdough. For a dairy-free option, coconut milk kefir can be used.
  • Vinegar: Combined with baking soda, vinegar acts as a leavening agent. It also contributes to the sourdough flavor without needing days of fermentation.
  • Lukewarm Water: Helps to activate the psyllium husks and create the right dough consistency.

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Recipe Tips & Swaps

Making the perfect keto sourdough baguettes can be easy with a few practical tips and swaps:

  • Measuring: Use a kitchen scale to measure all dry ingredients accurately. Using cups can lead to inconsistencies, especially with ingredients like psyllium husks and flax meal. Why does that happen? Some products may be ground finer and more dense than others.
  • Egg Whites: Use mostly egg whites to ensure the bread rises properly. Too many egg yolks can make the bread dense. For the same reason, use low-fat (not full-fat) buttermilk. Don't waste the egg yolks though! Use them for making Homemade Mayo, Easy Hollandaise Sauce or Lemon Curd.
  • Psyllium Husk Preparation: Always use powdered psyllium husks. Whole husks can lead to a coarse texture. Powder them yourself using a coffee grinder or food processor for the best results. Also note that psyllium absorbs lots of water. When baking with psyllium, you must remember to drink enough water throughout the day to prevent constipation!
  • Texture Adjustment: Psyllium can make the bread slightly moist. If needed, cut the baguettes in half and toast them before serving to reduce moisture.

Ingredient Swaps

Can't have dairy, nuts or psyllium? Here are some allergy-free tips!

  • Dairy-Free: Substitute low-fat buttermilk or kefir with coconut milk kefir for a dairy-free option. Try this coconut milk kefir recipe!
  • Nut-Free: Replace almond flour with an equal amount of ground sunflower seeds. Alternatively, check out these Nut-Free Keto Buns which use sesame seeds flour. For a sourdough version, use the wet ingredients in this recipe and skip the cream of tartar.
  • Psyllium-Free: Check out this Psyllium-Free Low-Carb Bread. For a sourdough version, use the wet ingredients in this recipe and skip the cream of tartar.

High-Altitude Baking Adjustments

Baking at high altitudes can impact your keto sourdough baguettes in several ways, typically causing faster rising, dryness, and texture changes. To address these issues:

  • Adjust Leavening: Reduce the amount of baking soda slightly to prevent over-rising. Consider baking at a slightly higher temperature for a shorter time to help the bread set more quickly.
  • Increase Moisture: Add an extra tablespoon or two of water or buttermilk/kefir to keep the dough moist. You can also add an extra egg white or a bit more fat to maintain moisture and structure.
  • Monitor Baking Time: Keep a close eye on the bread and check for doneness a few minutes earlier than the recipe suggests, as baking times may be shorter. The rule of thumb is to increase your oven temperature by 15-30F and start checking the bread after 25 minutes for small, or 35 minutes for large baguettes, instead of 30 minutes for small and 45 minutes for large baguettes.

How Long Can I Store this Keto Bread?

Store the baguettes at room temperature if you plan to consume them within a couple of days. For longer storage, freeze the baguettes for up to three months. Thaw them at room temperature or reheat directly from frozen.

Homemade Keto Bread Troubleshooting

Even with the best techniques, sometimes things can go wrong when baking keto sourdough baguettes. Here are some common issues and how to troubleshoot them:

1. Hollow Bread with Large Air Pockets

  • Cause: Using lukewarm water can slow down the raising effect of baking soda, leading to air pockets. Also, over-mixing can contribute to an uneven texture with large air pockets with dense parts. Finally, using whole psyllium powder is not recommended.
  • Solution: Ensure your water is the right temperature and avoid over-processing the dough. If you're experiencing hollow insides, try using boiling water instead of lukewarm.

2. Dense or Heavy Bread

  • Cause: The wrong type of psyllium powder. This can happen if your psyllium husk powder is too fine or if you over-process the dough.
  • Solution: Always powder whole psyllium husks yourself to avoid overly fine powder. Use a coffee grinder or a food processor to powder them first. Also, mix the dough just until combined, as over-mixing can make it dense.

I've baked dozens of keto breads and I made all of them using whole psyllium husks that I powdered myself. Ready-made psyllium husk powder is often too fine and makes any keto bread too dense, flat and heavy. Sometimes the bread would also get a purple hue!

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3. Bread Burns Easily

  • Cause: The buttermilk or kefir in the recipe can cause the bread to burn more easily.
  • Solution: Make sure you use the correct temperature and time. This will also depend on the oven and altitude. If your baguettes are prone to burning, lower the temperature slightly and extend the baking time. Also, loosely covering the baguettes with a baking foil or parchment paper will prevent the tops from browning too fast.

4. Moist Texture

  • Cause: Psyllium husk retains moisture, leading to a slightly wet texture.
  • Solution: Cut the baguettes in half and toast them before serving to reduce moisture. Ensure you're using the correct amount of psyllium husk powder.

5. Purple Hue

  • Cause: Some brands of ready-made psyllium husk powder can sometimes cause these issues.
  • Solution: Always use freshly powdered whole psyllium husks.

6. Ammonia-like Aftertaste

  • Cause: Rancid nut and seed flour, especially flax meal, will cause a fishy, off-smelling odor and taste.
  • Solution: Check your flax meal for freshness before use. Always store your nut and seed flours in the fridge or freezer.

7. Bread Doesn't Rise

  • Cause: Too many egg yolks can prevent the bread from rising. Also, over-processing can lead to a flat bread.
  • Solution: Do not swap the egg whites with whole eggs. The egg whites help the bread rise while keeping it light. Also, mix the dough just until combined, as over-mixing can make it dense.

By following these troubleshooting tips, you can overcome common issues and achieve the perfect keto sourdough baguettes every time.

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Keto Bread Recipes You Will Love

Sourdough Keto Baguettes Sourdough Keto Baguettes Sourdough Keto Baguettes
Sourdough Keto Baguettes Sourdough Keto Baguettes Sourdough Keto Baguettes

Hands-on Overall

Serving size 1 regular baguette

Allergy information for Sourdough Keto Baguettes

✔  Gluten free
✔  Nightshade free
✔  Pork free
✔  Avocado free
✔  Fish free
✔  Shellfish free
✔  Beef free
Pescatarian
Vegetarian

Nutritional values (per 1 regular baguette)

Net carbs4.5 grams
Protein12.2 grams
Fat16.4 grams
Calories232 kcal
Calories from carbs 8%, protein 23%, fat 69%
Total carbs14.1 gramsFiber9.6 gramsSugars2.8 gramsSaturated fat2.7 gramsSodium538 mg(23% RDA)Magnesium100 mg(25% RDA)Potassium360 mg(18% EMR)

Ingredients (makes 8 regular baguettes or 16 mini baguettes)

Dry ingredients:
Wet ingredients:
  • 6 large egg whites
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup low-fat buttermilk or kefir (180 g/ 6.5 oz) - or coconut milk kefir for dairy-free
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar (60 ml/ 2 fl oz)
  • 1 cup lukewarm water (240 ml/ 8 fl oz)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 °C/ 355 °F (fan assisted), or 200 °C/ 400 °F (conventional). Use a kitchen scale to measure all the ingredients carefully. Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl (almond flour, coconut flour, ground flaxseed, psyllium powder, baking soda, and salt).
    Sourdough Keto Baguettes
  2. In a separate bowl, mix the eggs, egg whites and buttermilk (or use coconut milk kefir for dairy-free).
    Sourdough Keto Baguettes
  3. Add the egg mixture and process well using a mixer until the dough is thick. Add vinegar and lukewarm water and process until well combined.
    Sourdough Keto Baguettes
  4. Do not over-process the dough. Using a spoon, make 8 regular or 16 mini baguettes and place them on a baking tray lined with parchment paper or a non-stick mat. They will rise, so make sure to leave some space between them. Optionally, score the baguettes diagonally and make 3-4 cuts. Sourdough Keto Baguettes
  5. Place in the oven and cook for 10 minutes. Then, reduce the temperature to 150 °C/ 300 °F (fan assisted), or 170 °C/ 340 °F (conventional) and bake for another 30-45 minutes (small baguettes will take less time to cook). Sourdough Keto Baguettes
  6. Remove from the oven, let the tray cool down and place the baguettes on a rack to cool down to room temperature. Store them at room temperature if you plan to use them in the next couple of days or store in the freezer for up to 3 months.
    Sourdough Keto Baguettes
  7. Enjoy just like regular baguettes! To save time, mix all the dry ingredients ahead and store in a zip-lock bag and add a label with the number of servings. When ready to be baked, just add the wet ingredients. Sourdough Keto Baguettes

Sourdough Keto Baguettes

4.7 stars, average of 1,148 ratings
Sourdough Keto Baguettes
The best low-carb, gluten-free & grain-free bread that tastes like sourdough. No sugar, no flour, no yeast and no fermentation needed!
Hands on15m
Overall1h

Ingredients (makes 8 regular baguettes or 16 mini baguettes)

  • Dry ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup almond flour (150 g/ 5.3 oz)
  • 2/3 cup psyllium husks - will be powdered, will make about 1/3 cup psyllium husk powder (40 g/ 1.4 oz)
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour (60 g/ 2.1 oz)
  • 1/2 packed cup flax meal (75 g/ 2.6 oz)
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • Wet ingredients:

  • 6 large egg whites
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup low-fat buttermilk or kefir (180 g/ 6.5 oz) - or coconut milk kefir for dairy-free
  • 1/4 cup white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar (60 ml/ 2 fl oz)
  • 1 cup lukewarm water (240 ml/ 8 fl oz)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180 °C/ 355 °F (fan assisted), or 200 °C/ 400 °F (conventional). Use a kitchen scale to measure all the ingredients carefully. Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl (almond flour, coconut flour, ground flaxseed, psyllium powder, baking soda, and salt).
  2. In a separate bowl, mix the eggs, egg whites and buttermilk (or use coconut milk kefir for dairy-free).
  3. Add the egg mixture and process well using a mixer until the dough is thick. Add vinegar and lukewarm water and process until well combined.
  4. Do not over-process the dough. Using a spoon, make 8 regular or 16 mini baguettes and place them on a baking tray lined with parchment paper or a non-stick mat. They will rise, so make sure to leave some space between them. Optionally, score the baguettes diagonally and make 3-4 cuts.
  5. Place in the oven and cook for 10 minutes. Then, reduce the temperature to 150 °C/ 300 °F (fan assisted), or 170 °C/ 340 °F (conventional) and bake for another 30-45 minutes (small baguettes will take less time to cook).
  6. Remove from the oven, let the tray cool down and place the baguettes on a rack to cool down to room temperature. Store them at room temperature if you plan to use them in the next couple of days or store in the freezer for up to 3 months.
  7. Enjoy just like regular baguettes! To save time, mix all the dry ingredients ahead and store in a zip-lock bag and add a label with the number of servings. When ready to be baked, just add the wet ingredients.

Nutrition (per 1 regular baguette)

Calories232kcal
Net Carbs4.5g
Carbohydrates14.1g
Protein12.2g
Fat16.4g
Saturated Fat2.7g
Fiber9.6g
Sugar2.8g
Sodium538mg
Magnesium100mg
Potassium360mg

Detailed nutritional breakdown (per 1 regular baguette)

Net carbsProteinFatCalories
Total per 1 regular baguette
4.5 g12.2 g16.4 g232 kcal
Almond flour (blanched ground almonds, almond meal)
1.6 g4 g9.8 g111 kcal
Psyllium husk powder
0.5 g0.2 g0 g3 kcal
Coconut flour, organic
0.8 g1.3 g1.1 g28 kcal
Flaxmeal (flax meal), ground flaxseed
0.1 g1.7 g4 g50 kcal
Baking soda, raising agent (bicarbonate of soda)
0 g0 g0 g0 kcal
Salt, pink Himalayan rock salt
0 g0 g0 g0 kcal
Egg white, fresh
0.2 g2.7 g0 g13 kcal
Egg, whole, fresh, raw (free-range or organic eggs)
0.1 g1.6 g1.2 g18 kcal
Milk, buttermilk, fluid, cultured, lowfat
1.1 g0.8 g0.2 g9 kcal
Wine vinegar
0 g0 g0 g1 kcal
Water, still
0 g0 g0 g0 kcal

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Martina Slajerova
Creator of KetoDietApp.com

Martina Slajerova

I changed the way I ate in 2011, when I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid. I had no energy, and I found it more and more difficult to maintain a healthy weight.

That’s when I decided to quit sugar, grains, and processed foods, and to start following a whole-foods-based ketogenic approach to food.

Let us know what you think, rate this recipe!

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Comments (171)

Hi.
Do I have to use honeyville almond flour ? What about Bob’s Red Mill ? And how about Bob’s Red Mill for the coconut flour or do I have to use the same one you used ?
Many thanks

Hi, I don't have these because I live in the UK but I do use fine almond flour. The options you listed should be fine (as I conformed with my followers).

Hi,
   I tasted sourdough pizza at a restaurant a few weeks ago and loved it. I wanted to try to reproduce it keto-style by combining your sourdough baguette recipe and your thin keto pizza crust recipe.
   My results have been ok except the 'sourdough' taste doesn't come through as strong as I'd like, especially after toppings are put on. I am thinking of adding more buttermilk and apple cider in place of water to the mixture. And also wondering if I can replace the coconut flour by adding more almond flour.
   Does it seem like I am on the right track, or have I reached the limit as to how strong I can make the 'sourdough' flavor, in your opinion? Btw I enjoy both recipes as they are very good.
   TIA.

Thank you Barry! I think that a little more vinegar would be a safer option as you don'y want too much liquid and you'll only need 1-2 more tablespoons. Experimenting with different flours may also help. Just remember that coconut flour is more absorbent than almond flour so you'll need more almond flour and possibly less liquid ingredients. When you see the batter you will know if it needs more almond flour and you could always add a little more.

I’m interested in making keto, or just healthier, low carb sourdough bread.  I also love nuts and seeds and wondered if and when and what could be added to this recipe.

A seed topping would be delicious - sunflower seeds, poppy seeds and/or spices like caraway seeds would all be great options. Walnuts added directly to the dough will be delicious too.

Do you think sour cream would work in place of buttermilk? 3/4 cup also?

I would try using the same amount and only if the mixture is too dry, add about 1/4 cup more water.

Hope this doesn't double post. Didn't post for a few days.
Greetings. Hope you're doing well. Greatly appreciate your hard work and willingness to share your recipes. Having been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes a little over a year ago, along with exercise, I have greatly changed my nutrition to one that I would say is a "weak" keto style. Definitely under 50 carbs over a 24 hour period and normally under 30 daily. Keto recipes have been a God-send for me and hopefully others. My diabetes is under great control now and so much so, I no longer take any meds for it. People like you have been very helpful. Can't thank you enough.
I've been teaching myself to cook in the past several months and have enjoyed more successes than disasters. Days ago I baked my first bread (keto) and someone was looking out for me. Though a bit bland, it actually turned out very well. I believe I can "excite" it a little without going stupid with it.
I'll soon be trying this recipe with perhaps a substitute or two like ACV for buttermilk. BTW, I didn't realize the characteristic of a moist bread when using psyllium husk powder. As you suggested as a work around, tonight I just happened to have taken one of my keto rolls, split it a toasted it. Though it only had something along the lines of a lower half slightly gummy core, the toaster oven took care of that. For context, those roll (6 per recipe) were probably very near a solid 2" in diameter (flat bottom). Topped the toasted surfaces with garlic / chive cream cheese. Not bad. Had them with a slow-cooked pot roast with baby carrots, turnips, radishes. Thickened some of the juices with xanthan gum and made a very nice thickened gravy. What a ramble.
Lol. I do have a question though. As I read all comments, I saw a few issues with a "soupy" mix. Granted I know nothing about baking, but I have an assumption. Enlighten me please. I reckon I just assumed if scratch bread is being made, regardless of the kind of bread it might be, the moisture content of the mix is constant in the world of bread making. Kind of a Play-Doh consistency. No?
Anyhow, I was researching if there was such a thing as keto sourdough bread. After viewing a few recipes, I landed here and am glad I did.
When I make this soon, I'll try and return and post the results.
Thank you,
Richard

Thank you so much for sharing this with us Richard. Yes, the dough should be thick & sticky, definitely not soupy. Runny dough (or batter) is more common for cakes. If anyone had a soupy dough issue, they'd have to use too much liquids (for example larger eggs than recommended) and/or not enough dry ingredients (usually down to not weighing them). Psyllium, flax meal and coconut flour are the most absorbent ingredients so they would be the ones I'd definitely weigh as well as almond flour. I always recommend weighing dry ingredients that are used in larger amounts than a teaspoon because different products could have different densities and a cup of flax may not always weigh the same. I hope you like this bread once you make it!

Really good! The apple cider vinegar was too strong for me so I use lemon juice. I also use powdered buttermilk.
I weigh or measure the dry into the stand mixer bowl, stir to combine then dump all of the wet on top and beat it until it's nice and fluffy.
I then scoop an 8th of the batter with my hands, gently roll it into an oblongish ball and plop them on the silpat. Makes happy sandwiches.

Thank you so much for the tips Patricia, I'm glad you enjoyed!

Can the buttermilk be omitted?

Hi Belle, you could use more water instead (or almond milk) and add a bit more vinegar for flavour (maybe 1 tbsp).

Just made this recipe, and well I wish I could have attached a picture.  The bread did not rise.  They look like a granola bar.  They do have a good flavor, and all would have been perfect if they had just puffed up.  Not sure how I can slice these to make sandwiches.  So sad.

That must be the psyllium - I suppose you used psyllium powder? I'm sorry this happened to you Terri! I have an image here that may help: The Best Low-Carb Yeast Bread
I couldn't figure out why this was happening to some people until I bought the wrong psyllium myself. Have a look at what I wrote about it - I will also include it here.

Oh yes, and made my own buttermilk with 1 tbsp of Apple cider vinegar , 1/2 cup of HWC. and half a cup of almond milk 😊

Hi there, I just made this recipe and made them into buns instead... I have to say this is the best recipe I've tried yet! they came out perfect! And if you didn't know the difference, you would think that they were any store bought wholewheat buns! I have made so many different breads and buns being on Keto, and can not stand the flavor, not these! Thank you sooo much for this wonderful recipe!
Judy

Thank you so much Judy! And thank you for the homemade buttermilk suggestion

I can't do buttermilk. DO you think this recipe would work with 2% milk, with a bit of vinegar added?
I'm trying to think of a lower-carb alternative that would still give that flavour.

You could use coconut milk kefir (see options listed as alternatives) or use full-fat milk with some vinegar or lemon juice (full-fat is ok as an alternative, it's 3-4% fat). Even if you use milk, it won't have a significant impact on the carb count.

Absolutely a fantastic recipe - thank you for sharing!  I made meatball subs with these, as one of the other commenters did.  This bread is so soft and perfect for a baked sandwich.  This recipe is going in my low carb treasure chest, and I will definitely be sharing on my blog!  Thank you Martina, you are a kitchen wizard!

Thank you so much Arthur, I'm glad you enjoyed!

This looks like a great 'bread' recipe, or even a nice 'loaf' but it most certainly isn't sourdough!!!
The sour flavor comes from fermentation not vinegar!  You shouldn't call it sourdough, it's misleading.

Dear Meg, in that case we shouldn't call this a "bread" because there is no "real" flour used. Same would apply to almost anything made low-carb.

I think you are missing the point. Why would anyone think there is actual fermentation? For the same reason I never expected wheat flour in this recipe. Cauliflower rice is not rice but it's great for keto. Zucchini noodles are not pasta but I love them anyway. I think the description was quite clear and I do not feel misled.

I agree that this is not a sourdough as sourdough implies that you are using a starter and that it is leavened by natural yeast. It may have a nice sour flavor, but a sourdough it isn't. And yeah, i get that you're using the term "bread" loosely too but this recipe is way more of a "bread" than it is a sourdough.

Made this per instructions (weighed all dry ingredients) and they came out perfect. A great low carb bread!  My only feedback is that it did not taste like sourdough bread. It tasted like one of the better low carb breads I’ve made.  I will definitely make again. Thank you!

Thank you! I'm still working on "the perfect" sourdough bread recipe - I'm getting close! 😊

I have made these but after removing from oven they all fell flat. Flavor is great but I have flat bread. Any idea why I must have done wrong?

Hi Jim, it looks like the dough may have been over-processed or there was too much baking soda. Check out the troubleshooting part in this recipe: The Best Low-Carb & Paleo Bread - The Ultimate Guide I hope this helps!

I am unable to print any of the recipes, since this site was updated.  I'm using an HP, if anyone can help me.

Hi Debra, the "print" option is right below the list of ingredients. There was no update recently apart from a few minor ones but nothing that should affect printing. Could it be your printer?

Delicious.  Can I make this into a Loaf using a bread pan?

Hi Paul, you can! Here's a guide: The Best Low-Carb & Paleo Bread - The Ultimate Guide

This recipe was easy to follow and the buns were great. I used them for meatball subs, it was a real treat. I am going to make these again to keep in the freezer so that I have them on hand.

Thank you Jenn, I'm glad you enjoyed!

will this work as a large loaf?
will this work with 2% milk?
what replacements can i use for the husk?

Hi Vanessa, yes these will work as a loaf too. You can find some more tips here - they apply to all keto bread recipes: The Best Low-Carb & Paleo Bread - The Ultimate Guide
I wouldn't use milk because it wouldn't result in the same effect (you need something sour so full-fat yogurt mixed with some full-fat milk can be a good alternative. There are extra carbs but they will be negligible.

I found this recipe a little confusing. You mix the dough until thick and then add another cup and a quarter of liquid which makes it like soup. But at the same time it says not to over process. I had to add more husk to get it to thicken enough to form rolls. When I first took them out of the oven they looked great, like real bread. Then they immediately fell flat and I discovered that they were still sticky inside. Baking them longer did not help at all.

Hi Lesley, I'm sorry to hear that. I must have made this recipe a hundred times and never needed to add psyllium - are you sure you used the right amounts? It does sound like there was too much psyllium powder and the dough couldn't rise - was too dense. Or did you maybe use whole psyllium husks? That would explain why you needed to use more. It's always best to use a kitchen scale.

I had this same issue. I weighed all of the ingredients, I used psyllium husk powder (not whole husks) and the “dough” was so wet upon adding 1 cup of water it did not come together. I still attempted to bake it and got flat disks instead of rolls. I have now attempted twice and am super perplexed.

Hi Malorie, I think I figured it out. It's the psyllium powder - to be more specific it's some of the brands. A friend of mine gave me two packs of psyllium powder and even before I used it I noticed it looks different. It was very fine and very dense. It made my bread dark and it didn't rise at all. I'm planning to share my thoughts in a post devoted to psyllium and share photos to make sure people get the right type of psyllium.

I had the same problem. I use NOW foods psyllium husk powder - the dough is too liquid after adding the specified amount of water. So despite advising against it, I add less water (a bit more than half a cup) - just enough so it looks just like in the photographs.
The result is very good, but stll a bit flat. Turns out better and better every time though.
Perhaps I should wait for the post about psyllium)

Hi Natalia, I ALWAYS have great results with whole psyllium husks that I "powder" in a food processor or a coffee grinder. You may want to try that in the meantime 😊

So sorry to bother but I can't do dairy and the link to the dairy free option isn't working. Could you please give idea & measurement for the "dairy" part? Is really like to make these if I can 😊
Thank you so much.

Hi Dawn, thank you for letting me know, the website has removed the recipe! I linked to my homemade coconut milk kefir (mixed with water) which can be used as an alternative. I hope this helps!

I made these for the first time today and I am really impressed.  The recipe was clear and easy to follow.  I appreciated the extra notes, like weighing all the dry ingredients. They turned out exactly like the photos. The only thing I found, after 45mins in the oven, I cut one in half and the middle was still doughy and sticky, so I cut them all (I made mini ones) in half and put them back in the oven for another 10mins and that worked perfectly, all completely cooked and crisp.  I just made one as a salad sandwich and it was really delicious and a nice texture (which often keto bread isn't) and they also toast up perfectly.  I am definitely going to make another batch to keep in the freezer. Thanks so much for this recipe!

Thank you Tanya! One thing that I forgot to mention is that I'm using fan assisted oven - maybe you are using conventional? In that case you'd need to add 20 C more. I'll clarify in the steps just in case!

I am keto and looking for a sourdough 'taste' to add to my regular keto bread. I was excited when I first saw this link, but the buttermilk would make this non-keto bread - "cultured buttermilk is made with low fat milk, and thus begins and ends the fermenting process with a much higher sugar content. The finished product still has a substantial amount of lactose left behind. In fact, both original and cultured buttermilk have a similar macronutrient profile to whole milk and are thus not keto friendly foods."

I'm not sure where that is taken from but it is incorrect in terms of being keto-friendly. This amount of buttermilk will still keep the carbs low, 4.5 g net carbs is very low and that's with the buttermilk fully included. You need to use low-fat buttermilk because otherwise the dough will become too dense. There are no "keto" or "non-keto" foods, even carrot is keto if you use the right amounts. Your carb intake is what matters when you follow a keto diet 😊

Keto is not if it fits your macros ! It is not only about keeping carbs low , it is also about avoiding any foods with considerable glycemic load. By your logic , if i dont eat any other carbs , i can eat 4 tsp of sugar a day. It doesnt work like that. This is low carb but the buttermilk does not make it keto.
Great recipe though, hope there is a good substitute for buttermilk that is more keto compliant. Cheers!

I find it hilarious that you use the nickname "ketopolice" as if it's a good thing. That speaks for everything. Let's not get militant because you only look silly not to mention you don't understand human biology. She never said "if it fits your macros no matter what you eat", this is a conspiracy you created in your brain. When did she suggest you eat a teaspoon of sugar? Where did you read that buttermilk is not allowed? On another blog? I thought so.

I actually never claimed that as long as it fits your macros, you can eat anything. Comparing a small amount of cultured buttermilk to 4 teaspoons of sugar is an exaggeration to say the least.

Instead of using buttermilk you can mix unsweetened almond milk with lemon juice or apple cider vinegar and leave for 5 minutes.  From memory the ratio is 1 cup of almond milk to 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or ACV.  That is what I used instead of buttermilk and it worked a treat.  

Could you make a traditional sourdough starter with coconut flour, would that work with the receipe or do you have a reciepe with traditional starter

Hi Tom, I don't think that would work but I've achieved good results by culturing macadamia nuts with probiotics (recipe in my app): ketodietapp.com/

I have made this recipe three times now and while I love the taste of the loaves, I do have a little trouble getting them to rise and brown. They come out as more of a flat bread and greyish. Whole I can slice then and have made sandwiches out of them, they look nothing like the picture. Yours look deliciously brown and fluffy. Maybe I'm doing something wrong?

Hi Brianna, I think this is caused by the psyllium - are you using psyllium powder or whole husks which you "powder" yourself? I found that most store-bought psyllium powder makes my bread grey or even purple and really dense. The products I found were all too dense. Whenever I make my own psyllium powder by grinding whole husks, the bread is nice and fluffy.

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