Complete Keto Diet Food List
What to Eat and Avoid on a Low-Carb Diet

4.7 stars, average of 1,693 ratings

Complete Keto Diet Food List: What to Eat and Avoid on a Low-Carb DietShareFollow us 166.7k

I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer.

The KetoDiet approach is simple: It's about following a low-carb diet where the focus is on eating real food, not just food low in carbs. You can browse through hundreds of our keto recipes and filter by carb content, allergies or categories to help you meet your carb intake and start burning fat for energy.

To help you stick with the diet, I've also created several free and premium meal plans including some that are dairy-free and sweetener-free - check them out!

What to Eat and What to Avoid

In short, you should eat REAL food (meat, eggs, nuts, yogurt, vegetables and occasionally some fruits). Apart from the obvious limitation of net carb content in foods, it is also recommended to avoid processed food and any food that may contain preservatives and colourings.

KetoDiet is not just about losing weight at any cost; it's about adopting a healthier lifestyle.

Keto Food Pyramid

Here's our KetoDiet food pyramid we created for you - click on it to see the large version. Feel free to pin, share and print it!

Ketogenic Food Pyramid Pin itFollow us 88.6k

Below is a list of the most common low-carb foods recommended for the ketogenic diet. If you get my app, you'll be able to search through thousands of foods included in the KetoDiet database.

EAT Freely

Grass-fed and wild animal sources

  • grass-fed meat (beef, lamb, goat, venison), wild-caught fish & seafood (avoid farmed fish), pastured pork and poultry, pastured eggs, gelatin, ghee, butter - these are high in healthy omega 3 fatty acids (avoid sausages and meat covered in breadcrumbs, hot dogs, meat that comes with sugary or starchy sauces)
  • offal, grass-fed (liver, heart, kidneys and other organ meats)

Healthy fats

  • saturated fats (lard, tallow, chicken fat, duck fat, goose fat, clarified butter (ghee), butter, coconut oil and MCT oil)
  • monounsaturated fats (avocado oil, macadamia oil and olive oil)
  • polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 fatty acids, especially from animal sources (fatty fish and seafood)
  • You can find a complete guide to fats & oils in my post here. (which oils and fats are ideal for cold use, which for high-heat cooking and which to avoid)

Non-starchy vegetables and mushrooms

  • leafy greens (Swiss chard, bok choy, spinach, lettuce, chard, chives, endive, radicchio, etc.)
  • some cruciferous vegetables like kale (dark leaf), kohlrabi, radishes
  • celery stalk, asparagus, cucumber, summer squash (zucchini, spaghetti squash), bamboo shoots
  • mushrooms (white, brow, Portobello, shiitake, chanterelle, etc)

Fruits

  • avocado

Beverages and Condiments

Eat Occasionally

Vegetables and Fruits

  • some cruciferous vegetables (white and green cabbage, red cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, fennel, turnips, rutabaga / swede)
  • nightshades (eggplant, tomatoes, peppers)
  • some root vegetables (parsley root), spring onion, leek, onion, garlic, winter squash (pumpkin)
  • sea vegetables (nori, kombu), okra, bean sprouts, sugar snap peas, wax beans, globe or French artichokes, water chestnuts
  • berries (blackberries, blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, cranberries, mulberries, etc.)
  • coconut, rhubarb, olives

Grain-fed animal sources and full-fat Dairy

  • beef, poultry, eggs and ghee (avoid farmed pork, it's too high in omega 6 fatty acids)
  • dairy products (plain full-fat yogurt, cottage cheese, heavy cream, sour cream, cheese) - avoid products labeled "low-fat", most of them are packed with sugar and starch that will only stimulate your appetite. You can read more in this post: Dairy on a Ketogenic Diet.
  • bacon - beware of preservatives and added starches (nitrates are acceptable if you eat foods high in antioxidants)

Nuts and seeds

  • macadamia nuts (very low in carbs, high in monounsaturated fats)
  • pecans, almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts, flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds
  • brazil nuts (beware of very high level of selenium - don't eat too many of them!)
  • You can read more in this post: Nuts & Seeds on a Ketogenic Diet, and in this post: Is Flaxseed Healthy?

Fermented soy products

  • if eaten, only non GMO and fermented soy products such as Natto, Tempeh, tamari (gluten-free soy sauce) or paleo-friendly coconut aminos
  • Edamame (green soy beans), black soybeans - unprocessed

Condiments

  • healthy zero-carb sweeteners (Stevia, Swerve, Erythritol, etc.)
  • thickeners: arrowroot powder, xanthan gum (keep in mind xanthan gum is not paleo-friendly - some people following the paleo diet use it, as you only need a very little amount)
  • sugar-free tomato products (puree, passata, ketchup)
  • cocoa and carob powder, extra dark chocolate (more than 70%, better 90% and beware of soy lecithin), cocoa powder
  • beware of sugar-free chewing gums and mints - some of them have carbs from sugar alcohols like sorbitol, maltitol and xylitol that may raise blood sugar and cause digestive issues

Some Vegetables, Fruits, Nuts and Seeds with Average Carbohydrates - depends on your daily carb limit

  • root vegetables (celery root, carrot, beetroot, parsnip and sweet potato)
  • watermelon, Cantaloupe / Galia / Honeydew melons
  • pistachio and cashew nuts, chestnuts
  • Only very small amounts, better avoided completely: apricot, dragon fruit (Pitaya), peach, nectarine, apple, grapefruit, kiwifruit, kiwi berries, orange, plums, cherries, pears, figs (fresh)

Alcohol

  • dry red wine, dry white wine, spirits (unsweetened) - avoid for weight loss, only for weight maintenance

Avoid Completely
Food rich in carbohydrates, factory-farmed meat and processed foods

  1. Any foods with added sugar. Avoid sweeteners that raise blood sugar, cause insulin spikes, stimulate your appetite and kick you out of ketosis.

  2. All grains, even whole meal (wheat, rye, oats, corn, barley, millet, bulgur, sorghum, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, sprouted grains), quinoa and white potatoes. this includes all products made from grains (pasta, bread, pizza, cookies, crackers, etc.) sugar and sweets (table sugar, HFCS, agave syrup, ice creams, cakes, sweet puddings and sugary soft-drinks).

  3. Factory-farmed pork and fish are high in inflammatory omega 6 fatty acids and farmed fish may contain PCBs, avoid fish high in mercury.

  4. Processed foods containing carrageenan (e.g. some almond milk products - watch for additives), MSG (e.g. in some whey protein products), sulphites (e.g. in dried fruits, gelatin), BPAs (they don't have to be labeled!), wheat gluten.

  5. Artificial sweeteners (Splenda, Equal, sweeteners containing Aspartame, Acesulfame, Sucralose, Saccharin, etc.) - these may cause cravings and have been linked to other health issues such as migraines.

  6. Refined fats / oils (e.g. sunflower, safflower, cottonseed, canola, soybean, grapeseed, corn oil), trans fats such as margarine.

  7. "Low-fat", "low-carb" and "zero-carb" products (Atkins products, diet soda and drinks, chewing gums and mints may be high in carbs or contain artificial additives, gluten, etc.)

  8. Milk (only small amounts of raw, full-fat milk is allowed). Milk is not recommended for several reasons. Firstly, all the dairy products, milk is difficult to digest, as it lacks the "good" bacteria (eliminated through pasteurization) and may even contain hormones. Secondly, it is quite high in carbs (4-5 grams of carbs per 100 ml). For coffee and tea, replace milk with cream in reasonable amounts. You may have a small amount of raw milk but be aware of the extra carbs. Lastly, farmers in the United States use genetically engineered bovine growth hormone (rBGH). rBGH is injected to dairy cows to increase milk production. Opt for full-fat dairy labeled “NO rBGH”.

  9. Alcoholic, sweet drinks (beer, sweet wine, cocktails, etc.) - you can try my low-carb cocktails and drinks.

  10. Tropical fruit (pineapple, mango, banana, papaya, etc.) and some high-carb fruit (tangerine, grapes, etc.) Also avoid fruit juices (yes, even 100% fresh juices!) - better to drink smoothies if any, but either way very limited. Juices are just like sugary water, but smoothies have fiber, which is at least more sating. This also includes dried fruit (dates, raisins, etc).

  11. Mainly for health reasons, avoid soy products apart from a few non-GMO fermented products which are known for their health benefits. Also avoid wheat gluten which may be used in low-carb foods. When you give up bread, you shouldn't eat any part of it. Beware of BPA-lined cans. If possible, use naturally BPA-free packaging like glass jars or make your own ingredients such as ghee, ketchup, coconut milk or mayonnaise. BPA has been linked to many negative health effects such as impaired thyroid function and cancer. Other additives to avoid: carrageenan (e.g. almond milk products), MSG (e.g. in some whey protein products) and sulfites (e.g. in dried fruits, gelatin).

  12. Legumes (beans, chickpeas, lentil, peanuts, etc). Apart from peanuts, legumes are relatively high in carbs and should be avoided. Apart from their high carb content, legumes contain lectins and phytates which makes them hard to digest. They have been linked to leaky gut syndrome, PCOS, IBS and Hashimoto's. When it comes to peanuts, some people avoid them while others use them in moderation. If you are considering peanuts, make sure you read this post first: Peanuts on a Ketogenic Diet: Eat or Avoid?

Free Keto Diet Plans

Sign up for FREE and get:

  • 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy
  • Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox
  • A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week

Net Carbs in Commonly Used Recommended Foods

Animal products

Source Net Carbs (grams) Serving size
meat and fish 0 150 g / 5.3 oz
organ meats, liver (average) 3 150 g / 5.3 oz
prawns (cooked) 1.4 150 g / 5.3 oz
eggs 0.7 piece, large
cream (full-fat) 1.6 1/4 cup, 60 ml / 2 fl oz
butter 0 1 tbsp
cheese (hard) 0.4 30 g / 1 oz
cream cheese (full-fat) 1.6 1/4 cup, 50 g / 1.75 oz


Vegetables

Source Net Carbs (grams) Serving size
lettuce (sliced, average) 0.5 1 cup, 50 g / 1.75 oz
swiss chard, sliced 0.8 1 cup, 35 g / 1.25 oz
collard greens, sliced 0.8 1 cup, 35 g / 1.25 oz
bok choy, sliced 0.8 1 cup, 70 g / 2.4 oz
asparagus 2.7 150 g / 5.3 oz
green beans 6.4 150 g / 5.3 oz
summer squash (zucchini / courgette) 3.2 150 g / 5.3 oz
winter squash (pumpkin) 9 150 g / 5.3 oz
cucumber 2.2 150 g / 5.3 oz
spinach, cooked 1.2 1/2 cup, 90 g / 3.2 oz
kale (Italian dark-leaf) 2.1 150 g / 5.3 oz
kale (curly) 5.4 150 g / 5.3 oz
savoy cabbage 4.5 150 g / 5.3 oz
cabbage (white) 5 150 g / 5.3 oz
cabbage (red) 7.9 150 g / 5.3 oz
celery stalk 1.6 3 medium, 120 g / 4.2 oz
peppers (green) 3.5 piece, 120 g / 4.2 oz
peppers (red) 4.7 piece, 120 g / 4.2 oz
tomatoes, chopped 4.8 1 cup, 180 g / 6.3 oz
eggplant (aubergine) 3.5 150 g / 5.3 oz
broccoli, chopped 6.1 150 g / 5.3 oz
cauliflower 4.5 150 g / 5.3 oz
mushrooms, white 3.4 150 g / 5.3 oz
mushrooms, brown 5.6 150 g / 5.3 oz
onion, white (sliced) 2.2 1/4 cup, 40 g / 1.4 oz
garlic 0.9 1 clove


Fruit

Source Net Carbs (grams) Serving size
strawberries, sliced 4.7 1/2 cup, 85 g / 2.9 oz
raspberries 3.3 1/2 cup, 62 g / 2.2 oz
blackberries 3.1 1/2 cup, 72 g / 2.5 oz
blueberries 8.9 1/2 cup, 74 g / 2.6 oz
avocado 3.7 piece, average (200 g / 7 oz)


Nuts & Seeds

Source Net Carbs (grams) Serving size
macadamia nuts 1.5 30 g / 1 oz
almonds 2.7 30 g / 1 oz
pecans 1.2 30 g / 1 oz
hazelnuts 2 30 g / 1 oz
walnuts 2 30 g / 1 oz
cashew nuts 7.6 30 g / 1 oz
pumpkin seeds 1.3 30 g / 1 oz
sunflower seeds 3.2 30 g / 1 oz
tahini (unsweetened sesame paste) 1.8 1 tbsp
chia seeds 0.4 1 tbsp
pistachio nuts 4.9 30 g / 1 oz


Condiments & Other

Source Net Carbs (grams) Serving size
almond milk (unsweetened) 0.3 1/4 cup, 60 ml / 2 fl oz
coconut milk 1.6 1/4 cup, 60 ml / 2 fl oz
coconut milk (creamed) 2.7 1/4 cup, 60 ml / 2 fl oz
olives 0.2 30 g / 1 oz
sauerkraut (solids only) 0.5 1/4 cup, 35 g / 1.25 oz
mustard 0.7 1 tbsp
tomato puree 5.7 1 tbsp
apple cider vinegar 0.1 1 tbsp
coconut aminos 1 1 tbsp
dark chocolate (85%) 5.7 30 g / 1 oz
coconut flour 3.2 1/4 cup, 30 g / 1 oz
almond flour 2.2 1/4 cup, 25 g / 0.9 oz
flax meal 0.6 1/4 cup, 38 g / 1.3 oz
psillium hush powder 1.4 1/4 cup, 16 g / 0.6 oz
Erythritol 0.5 1 tbsp
stevia (drops) < 0.1 1/4 tsp
wine (red, dry) 6 1 glass / 5 fl oz
wine (white, dry) 6 1 glass / 5 fl oz
spirits (sugar-free, ~ 40% vol) 0 1 jigger / 1.5 fl oz


Low-carb Sources of Your Daily Protein

Protein is not found just in meats. There are many meat-free and plant-based sources of protein! The more fat the meat contains, the less protein is usually has.

Meat, Fish and Seafood

Source Protein (grams) Serving size
turkey / chicken breast, raw 37 150 g / 5.3 oz
chicken thighs, raw 29 150 g / 5.3 oz
beef, lean steak, raw 31 150 g / 5.3 oz
beef steak, ribeye, raw 28 150 g / 5.3 oz
pork loin (chops), raw 31 150 g / 5.3 oz
venison steak, raw 32 150 g / 5.3 oz
lamb chops, raw 28 150 g / 5.3 oz
duck (meat only), raw 30 150 g / 5.3 oz
duck (meat and skin), raw 17 150 g / 5.3 oz
bacon, raw 12 3 slices / 90 g / 3.2 oz
chorizo salami, raw 22 90 g / 3.2 oz
salmon, raw 32 150 g / 5.3 oz
tuna, raw 37 150 g / 5.3 oz
cod, raw 27 150 g / 5.3 oz
sardines, raw 30 150 g / 5.3 oz
mackerel, raw 28 150 g / 5.3 oz
sea bass, raw 28 150 g / 5.3 oz
sea bream, raw 36 150 g / 5.3 oz
prawns, shrimps, mussels, clams, raw 22 150 g / 5.3 oz
octopus, raw 19 150 g / 5.3 oz
squid and calamari, raw 23 150 g / 5.3 oz
lobster, raw 25 150 g / 5.3 oz
gelatine 6 1 tbsp

For vegetarian options, these are the main sources of protein:

Eggs and Dairy

Source Protein (grams) Serving size
eggs, chicken 6.3 piece, large
eggs, duck 9 piece, large
cream (heavy whipping) 1.1 1/4 cup
cream (soured) 1.2 1/4 cup
cream cheese 3.5 1/4 cup
hard full-fat cheese (e.g. cheddar) 14.2 60 g / 2 oz
mozzarella 13.8 60 g / 2 oz
feta 8.1 60 g / 2 oz
mascarpone 3.6 1/4 cup
ricotta 6.9 1/4 cup

You can always boost your protein intake with high-quality whey protein powders. There is a good overview of other protein powders here (includes vegan options).

Apart from legumes (peanuts, chickpeas, lentils, etc.) and quinoa, which are not a part of the paleo diet, these are the main sources of protein for vegan-friendly diets:

Nuts and Seeds

Source Protein (grams) Serving size
almonds 6 30 g / 1 oz
walnuts 4.3 30 g / 1 oz
pecans 2.6 30 g / 1 oz
hazelnuts 4.2 30 g / 1 oz
macadamia nuts 2.2 30 g / 1 oz
cashew nuts 5.2 30 g / 1 oz
pistachio nuts 5.7 30 g / 1 oz
brazil nuts 4.1 30 g / 1 oz
pine nuts 3.9 30 g / 1 oz
pumpkin seeds 8.6 30 g / 1 oz
sunflower seeds 5.9 30 g / 1 oz
sesame seeds / tahini paste 5 30 g / 1 oz

Vegetables, Fruits and Other

Source Protein (grams) Serving size
broccoli 2.6 1 cup, chopped
broccoli raab 1.3 1 cup
sugar-snap peas 1.7 1 cup
green beans 1.8 1 cup
bean sprouts 1.5 1 cup
spinach 5.3 1 cup, cooked
kale 2.2 1 cup
artichoke 4.2 medium piece
asparagus 2.9 1 cup
cauliflower 2.1 1 cup, chopped
mushrooms, average 1-2.5 1 cup, sliced
coconut 1 1/4 cup, shredded
coconut milk 1.1 1/4 cup
avocado 4 piece, average
tempeh (fermented soy - paleo if non-GMO) 7.7 1/4 cup
sun-dried tomatoes 1.4 1/4 cup
seaweed (e.g. wakame) 10 1 cup
  1. Blog
  2. Guides
  3. Complete Keto Diet Food List: What to Eat and Avoid on a Low-Carb Diet
  1. Blog
  2. Nutrition
  3. Complete Keto Diet Food List: What to Eat and Avoid on a Low-Carb Diet
  1. Blog
  2. Diet & Nutrition
  3. Complete Keto Diet Food List: What to Eat and Avoid on a Low-Carb Diet
  1. Blog
  2. Martina Slajerova
  3. Complete Keto Diet Food List: What to Eat and Avoid on a Low-Carb Diet

Do you like this post? Share it with your friends! 

Martina Slajerova
Creator of KetoDietApp.com

Martina Slajerova

I changed the way I ate in 2011, when I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid. I had no energy, and I found it more and more difficult to maintain a healthy weight.

That’s when I decided to quit sugar, grains, and processed foods, and to start following a whole-foods-based ketogenic approach to food.

About the Reviewer

This article has been reviewed by Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE who is a qualified expert. At KetoDiet we work with a team of health professionals to ensure accurate and up-to-date information. You can find out more on the About us page.

Let us know what you think, rate this post!

Leave a comment

Cancel reply to comment


Note: Any links to products or affiliate links will not be approved.

B I U “ ”
  • Comment


Please, note that I do not offer personalised advice. For personalised advice you can contact one of our experts.

Comments (681)

Where  can  I  buy chicken That I can afford?

Reply

Here are some budget-friendly tips (scroll down to see where to buy meat): How to Stay Low-Carb and Keto on a Budget

Reply

I thought buckwheat was actually a seed not a grain. Is that nor correct? As a seed I had hoped it was Keto friendly.  :-(

Reply

I'm afraid buckwheat is too high in carbs for a keto diet.

Reply

Not long ago I have watched an eye opener presentation on TED about why humans are not carnivores, as a species.  Many scientific reasons were discussed but I only remember a few I guess the most relevant:
•  Humans unlike true carnivores do not have fangs to tear the flesh while the prey is walking.  We need to marinate it to tenderize and so on which basically indicates we are not carnivore and that eating meat is an acquired taste.  Humans are infatuated with the taste of meat and for long time now we have believed that eating meat is legitimate, a mistake with horrible consequences for animals and us.
•  Next, our gross intestine is at least 7M long, very similar to herbivores, whereas the carnivores have a very short gross intestine which clears and cleanse quickly. Humans eat species inappropriate food, such as meat which lingers in the intestine for long time and putrefies simply because we are not equipped to digest it.  Not to mention the struggle to excrete and the horrible smell.
•  One other proof we are not carnivores is the way we chew our food, sideways motion just like herbivores, whereas a carnivore chews with a up and down motion.
•  If one would like to trace back the humans feeding habits, one should go to Africa and observe what the tribes left untouched by the so-called civilization are eating…they only eat plants. And they would not be the only ones.  The further from the North American diet, the closer to the primordial human feeding habits.
•  Worried about proteins from plant being not enough, well if the large size herbivores such as elephants, or the prehistoric dinosaurs found sufficient protein in plants, humans should also be able to satisfy their protein needs by eating plants.  
Today, the kids don’t even know where the bacon is coming from and how it arrives on their plates.  The meat industry is big in commercials addressed to kids, but they never honestly explain to the kids how is that piece of burger or bacon really made.  Why, because if they would show how the animals are slaughtered it would terrify the children and since feeding habits form early in life they would lose an entire generation of meat consumers.
Most of those that would like to follow a low carb ketogenic diet will rush to buy their meat in the supermarkets. This is sourced from the slaughtering houses where the animal holocaust is happening needlessly, ever day.
On the other hand, if we are all to eat wild life, as you are suggesting…how many are we? 9 billion (just like viruses) we would decimate really fast every animal, bird and fish on this planet and then we would have to move to the next planet to consume its resources, and to the next, and to the next.  Back to you.

Reply

I beg to differ. Humans are not herbivores or carnivores, they are omnivores. There is no diet that fits all and I never said that everyone has to go carnivore. In fact, you can follow a vegan-friendly keto diet. A certain level of carb restriction is beneficial for the vast majority of people.
While I see your point with regards to animal suffering (which is an ongoing issue), this doesn't have to be the case and on the contrary, people are more and more interested in meat from ethical sources. Watching a TED talk may be an eye opener but we should all do some research on human evolution. Your comment is biased because it only looks at one side of the argument (not to mention that some points are totally wrong, such as comparing human digestion to elephants??)
When it comes to protein, you can do the calculation yourself. Unless you eat soy (an endocrine disruptor), legumes (high in carbs) or vegan protein supplements, you simply can't get the protein you need every day.
You asked: On the other hand, if we are all to eat wild life, as you are suggesting…how many are we? 9 billion (just like viruses) we would decimate really fast every animal, bird and fish on this planet and then we would have to move to the next planet to consume its resources, and to the next, and to the next.
Ask yourself again but imagine everyone is vegan. That's it - it's not sustainable either way. Human overpopulation is among the most pressing environmental issues that cannot be fixed by a single dietary approach.

Reply

Saying that carnivores excrete horrible smell.... well you really need to meet by vegan friend 🤢 There is nothing as bad as the smell that hits you after he leaves the toilet. All those nice fermented plants hit you with a swift punch. When I eat too many plants I get loose stools which is a clear sign of indigestion. Just saying.

Reply

I always thought BCAA broke the fast....is that not true?

Reply

When it comes to fasting, the limit is 50 calories: Complete Guide to Intermittent Fasting

Reply

I am trying to read up on micronutrients, but I don't understand what they are.

Reply

I appreciate the good work you are doing to make our lives better.
your information is clear and orderly.

Reply

Great page full of great info for anyone wanting to get started and great refresher. Thank you!
Here's my biggest complaint of all sites and recipes, etc... why can't people just leave the sugar, sweeteners and substitutes out of everything? They are totally not needed beyond what occurs naturally. my rant, sorry. God Bless.

Reply

I totally understand how you feel! 😊 But the truth is that most people can't do that... speaking from my own experience. When I started following a low-carb diet my palate was completely different to what it is now and I couldn't imagine skipping sweeteners, bread alternatives and other substitutes. They helped me transition into the way I eat now. These days I don't use any sweeteners - or just a small amount in occasional treats. I keep my diet very simple and often cook with just 5-10 ingredients.
Having said that, there is no (medical) reason for which these foods should be avoided. It does make life easier if you skip them as they are sometimes hard to find - you do have to find what works best for you. If using low-carb sweeteners and bread substitutes keep most people away from sugar and starch laden foods that's great. There are some dessert recipes with no sweeteners here - I think you'll like them 😊 ketodietapp.com/Blog/Filter

Reply

Thank you so much for the above information. Really very helpful for people like me. Just started Keto 3 weeks ago, I still get confused on my protein consumption and what vegetables have high carb content. This is by far the best “diet” I’ve been on as I feel I can go on forever and I’m not missing anything I actually eat what I want. I eat when I’m hungry and stop when I’m full, just extra cautious what I put in my body.

Reply

Hi!  I'm a newbie..what is a good supplement to use starting out? Or do I need to?  
Thanks so much for all the new info, much to learn 😊

Reply

Hi Jeannie, the only supplement I'd always recommend is magnesium because it's not easy to get enough of it no matter what diet you follow. Other than that you don't need to take any supplements (this of course also depends individual diets, lifestyle and potential deficiencies - for me that's vitamin D). Here's a list of recommended magnesium supplements:  Complete Guide to Magnesium Supplementation I hope this helps.

Reply

Thankyou for all this information ..it has really opened my eye's..and I never realised how many carbs are in things I never thought there would be..I shall most definitely be eating less carbs from here on in..again bless and thankyou so much for the info..🤗

Reply

Very informative thanks you. I am doing a LCHF diet with diabetes.co.uk I don't think I could go completely kept though. Having said that the information on here is very good.
Thanks
John

Reply

Thank you John! You may not need to go strict keto (ultra low-carb). In fact, any level of carbohydrate restriction is beneficial.

Reply

Thank you Martina!  I have been a healthy eater most of my life but the late 60's have there down side.  I have done the 3 day fast for kicking in keto and gone to  paleo after.  I am loosing muscule mass with age and this diet seems better in many ways. I am starting next week to get to 168 lbs. at 6' 0" or 15 lb weight loss. The most important factor is I can see myself staying on this diet for the rest of my life.  Thank You so much!

Reply

Thank you for sharing this with us, Neil! Good luck and keto on! 😊

Reply

This information was wally helpful. Just starting so thank you!

Reply

Your list is an excellent place to start with what to eat and not to each. As I get more time I will investigate further. Thank you, Martina

Reply

Thank you Martina!

Reply

If I have fat macros to meet each day, why aren't the fat counts included with the listed foods?
I know I can look elsewhere, but it seems odd to omit that piece of info while you're at it.

Reply

The focus is on carbs and protein as these are the most challenging macros to meet. Fat is eaten to satiety and most people don't have to track fat and calories. If you want to track your food intake, our app includes a food database with a complete list and macronutrients (all features are listed here: ketodietapp.com/). I hope this helps!

Reply

Your recipe for beef jerky lists "minced lean beef" as the main ingredient. What is minced lean beef? It looks like ground beef (hamburger) but I'm not sure. Thanks in advance!

Reply

Hi Cindy, it's the same as "ground" beef (just beef, no other ingredients). I hope this helps!

Reply

Is Kaizen whey isolate okay on Keto as it has nothing in but whey protein isolate, soy lecithin less than 1%, xantham gum and stevia extract?

Reply

Hi Vicky, if you can tolerate xanthan gum then it should be fine (it may cause GI distress so keep that in mind). It's ok as long as it's whey protein isolate (very low-carb) - not concentrate - and soy is only added in the form of lecithin (very small amount).

Reply

I've been in ketosis for over 2 weeks but I'm not losing any weight. I'm staying at the same weight.  I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong except maybe too many diet sodas or not enough vegetables. I wish I could find the portion sizes for the ideal diet somewhere, I don't want to have to count every gram of protein, fat, etc.  I just want the general portions of meat, vegetables, etc.

Reply

Hi Michelle, you won't need to do that once you learn what the ideal serving size is and how many carbs you should be eating. It's always best if you can track your food intake, at least for the first few weeks or months. Here's a post that may help: How To Low Carb: 15+ Common Weight Loss Mistakes

Reply

Amaranth,  quinoa and buckwheat are not grains, they are high protein seeds, so why are you excluding them? Seems like they are exactly what you would want in a keto diet.please clarify. Thanks

Reply

Hi Lora, these may be relatively high in protein but they are unfortunately still too high in carbs and not suitable for a keto diet.

Reply

Hello I haven't seen anything on cereals are there particular keto cereals or none at all?

Reply

I wish there were - I make my own. Check out these keto recipes: ketodietapp.com/Blog/searchFilter

Reply

Hello
is it important to count calories with the keto diet?
And how do I know my carb limit during the day?
Thank you.

Reply

Hi Ahmad, I suggest you check out these posts:
How To Low Carb: 15+ Common Weight Loss Mistakes (explains why calories matter but you you may not have to count them)
How Many Carbs per Day on a Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet?

Reply

Oh my goodness.
So glad I've found you.
Spend lots of time researching online. But not seen anything so "to the point".
I started Keto and IF 10 days ago.
Loving it but quite confused lol.
Thank you.
Kind regards
Karen, Isle of Wight UK

Reply

hello, i'm new to keto diet! I have a question need your help.
can I consume fresh figs? and watergrass?
thank you for your time!!

Reply

Hello, fresh figs are quite high in carbs but you could have a piece even when you follow a low-carb diet. It depends on your daily carb limit and I would avoid figs if it's less that 30 grams of net carbs.

Reply

When you talked about chocolate you mentioned avoiding soy lecithin. Does that apply just when choosing chocolate or with all food items?
Also, why should we avoid soy lecithin ?
Thank you.

Reply

Hi Louvdie, soy lecithin in chocolate is acceptable because of the very small amounts used (unless you strictly avoid it). There are health reasons why soy should not be included. Flavones and other phytoestrogens found in soy seem to either stimulate or suppress cancer growth, depending on dosage and other factors.

Reply

Do you have any suggestions on milk substitutes?  
I have a nut allergy, so almond milk is out.  
Is flax and/or pea milk (unsweetened) a keto-friendly substitute?

Reply

You can use seed milks (sunflower, flax or poppy). Or try coconut milk instead.

Reply

Load more comments, 634 remaining