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How to Make Infused Ghee

Ghee is a clarified butter that has no casein or lactose. It still tastes quite close to butter and is great for cooking. Why make ghee? You don't need to be an orthodox paleo eater or suffer from food allergies to make your own ghee at home.

I LOVE ghee! It's better for cooking and doesn't burn at high temperatures like butter does. You can also store it at room temperature and infuse it with ingredients like garlic, onion or any herbs!

And best of all: There are no carbs in infused ghee but you still get all the flavour in just a tablespoon of pure fat! This is great news for those that are eating as little carbs as possible. Just for comparison: One clove of garlic has about 1 gram of net carbs. It's not a lot but everything adds up, especially with ingredients like garlic or onion!

Preparation time

Overall

Nutritional values per 200 g / 7 oz jar:

0 grams 0 grams 0 grams 100 grams 60 grams 907 calories
Total Carbs0grams
Fiber0grams
Net Carbs0grams
Protein0grams
Fat100grams
of which Saturated60grams
Energy907kcal
Potassium24mg

Ingredients per jar (makes 13-15 servings / tablespoons):

  • 1 package unsalted butter (250g / 8.8 oz)
  • 1 head garlic or 1 onion or any fresh herbs of choice (rosemary, basil, sage, thyme, mint, etc.)

Note: When looking for ingredients, try to get them in their most natural form (organic, without unnecessary additives).

Equipment

  • small pouring pan
  • small Pyrex glass jar
  • cheesecloth for filtering the liquid
  • sieve with smallest holes possible
  • small glass container (~ 200 ml / 7 fl oz)

Instructions:

  1. I'm going to make my favourite ghee infused with garlic. You can use any herbs or onion, too. Peel and slice the garlic.
  2. Place the butter into a pan and start warming up on low heat. Slowly let it melt.
    Note: Even if you use salted butter, all the salt will separate from the fat and your ghee will not be affected.
  3. Add the sliced garlic and let it simmer. As the butter melts, pure fat will separate from the milk solids and water. Keep shimmering on low heat. The water will start to evaporate as soon as you see bubbles on the surface. As you see less and less bubbles, a white foam will appear on the surface.
  4. About 10 minutes after the butter melts, the milk solids (mostly lactose) will eventually get stuck on the sides and bottom of the pan and will get slightly brown.
  5. Take the pan from heat. Put a sieve on the top of the heat-resistant jug. Place the cheesecloth in a double layer onto the sieve and pour the ghee carefully through the cheesecloth.
  6. Discard the milk solids trapped in the cheesecloth and anything left in the pan.
  7. You should end up with something like 75-80% of the volume of the butter.
  8. Pour the ghee in a glass jar. After it cools down, you can either keep it refrigerated or at a room temperature.
    Note: Ghee purchased from a shop does not need to be refrigerated. Home-made ghee will not go bad if there are no milk solids left, just pure fat. However, it is always safer to keep it in your fridge.
  9. Seal the ghee when it cools down. Now it's ready to be stored! After a few hours, the ghee will naturally solidify…

Suggestions:

Be creative, try infusing ghee with vanilla bean, cinnamon or natural almond extract and use for making low-carb pancakes!

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Please, note that I do not offer personalised advice. For personalised advice you can contact one of our experts.

Comments (20)

I tried making ghee, but for some reason I couldn't get rid of all the solids and there was left a few millimeters thick layer of white stuff on the bottom of the jar. Can you always get rid of of all the solids easily? Perhanps this happened because I didn't have actual cheesecloth and used some sort of polyesther cloth instead. Maybe that material is the reason why some of the solids ran through it even after several attemps of trying to clarify the butter.

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Yes, you do need cheesecloth - maybe it wasn't dense enough and that's why it didn't catch all the solids. If I don't have any cheesecloth, I use a layer of paper towel and it works just fine - nothing goes through.

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Hi, Where would I find nice jars to store? Thank you

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Hi Juliet, I'd think Amazon? I can't remember where I got these from Smile

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was looking for this kind of easy recipe for Ghee prep...Thanks a lot for sharing... M definetly going to try this today

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Always! Smile

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i have been saving and using rendered chicken fat to grease my griddle and pan when searing.. I've seen the TV cooks use goose fat in dishes. Is it too weird to ask if Ghee from chicken/turkey fat will be fine and has anyone else done such?

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Hi Marsha, all can be used for cooking. Ghee is only made from butter - it's dairy fat. Goose fat or duck fat are great for greasing / cooking too just like ghee but they are made from the tissue / fat layer.

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Can I use ghee in place of butter as far as conversion rates go? Say if I wanted to use ghee in baking versus using butter? Tablespoon to tablespoon?
And how about the nutritional information? Is it the same as butter?

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Butter has about 80% fat and ghee is 100% fat. This means that you may need to use more butter for the same results and avoid using butter for high-heat cooking. There is about 15 grams of fat in a tablespoon of ghee and 12 grams of fat in a tablespoon of butter. This makes ghee slightly higher in calories (there is some water and lactose) Hope this helps Smile

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Hi, you say there is some water and lactose : in butter or in ghee ? Thank you.

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Hi Adel, there is some water, lactose, casein, etc. in butter. Ghee is pure fat unless it's not strained well.

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How long can you store it?

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Hi Darlene, you can store it up to 12 months but I usually finish is in a few weeks or a month Smile

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This sounds delicious, but isn't there a concern for botulism in garlic-infused oils? Or is that only for olive oil?

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Thank you for your comment! I don't think there is. I'm not storing garlic or herbs in the oil but discard it straight away after infusing it. I think this only applies to garlic or herbs stored in oil to infuse it slowly. However, this is only my opinion and I would suggest you ask a specialist.

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Ah cool - I use ghee almost exclusively in cooking, never bothered to try making it though, just assumed I'd lose most of my butter, but you reckon it yields ~75%?
Will try this garlic infused version when current ghee tub runs out (I go through a tub a week).

Reply

For cooking I use ghee, bacon grease, lard and coconut oil, but ghee is the #1 for me Smile
I used a 250 g package and it made the two small jars (on the photo), each of them is 100 ml, so it made about 75-80% ghee. It depends on the quality of the butter, water content, etc. Good butter should have 80-90% fat.

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This is a great read. I'll be trying this concoction this weekend. Thanks for this!

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Thank you! I was even thinking of trying dried mushrooms to "infuse" ghee... Smile

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